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Distributed FPGA Number Crunching For The Masses

Type
Audio
Tags
cracking, FPGA
Authors
Felix Domke
Event
Chaos Communication Congress 27th (27C3) 2010
Indexed on
Mar 27, 2013
URL
http://mirror.fem-net.de/CCC/27C3/mp3-audio-only/27c3-4203-en-distributed_fpga_number_crunching_for_the_masses.mp3
File name
27c3-4203-en-distributed_fpga_number_crunching_for_the_masses.mp3
File size
25.8 MB
MD5
b1006e9ed78212a2e894f5e35e51ec3c
SHA1
6e4634e53653e6ca93b343bcc710b0fa71c937f7

In 1998, the EFF built "Deep Crack", a machine designed to perform a walk over DES's 56-bit keyspace in nine days, for $250.000. With today's FPGA technology, a cost decrease of 25x can be achieved, as the copacobana project has shown. If that's still too much, two approaches should be considered: Recycling hardware and distributed computing. This talk will be about combining both approaches for the greater good. A number of projects (Copacobana, Picocomputing) have shown that with today's technology enough brute force computing power to break limited keylength ciphers (like DES) is affordable even for small companies. But what about Joe Geek at home? Recycling FPGAs is one option ([email protected]), distributed computing another (distributed.net, ...). This project combines both approaches, developing a toolchain that can be used to prototype a project on a low-end FPGA (or even in a free simulator), and then scaling up the effort across different implementations onto a large number of devices. An example client implementation uses an FPGA in a widely available consumer device to provide computing power when the device is in standby. Another approach that will be discussed in detail is how to obtain decommissioned high-end FPGA-based hardware. We will have hardware to show with a live demo!

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